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Christian - Pentecostal
The Origin and Beliefs of the Pentecostal Christianity
by Marcus J. Viduya

The origins of the Pentecostal movement are sketchy, at best. This may be due to the fact that there is no real organization between all churches that call themselves "Pentecostal." Some churches are independent, answering to no governing body and each may operate on its own. Other churches may be part of a network of churches, such as a fellowship or a denomination, which may share not only a name but also a documented philosophy and answer to some kind of governing hierarchy. Thus it is not uncommon for different churches and/or non-affiliated denominations to differ on some idea or detail of belief. For instance, there may be an independent church which has one philosophy of evangelism, such as "radical evangelistic" practices, operating just within walking distance from a Four Square Gospel church (part of a fellowship of churches) which has a more conservative yet organized form of evangelism. The Four Square church may preach with an emphasis on building Christians for various ministries, including witnessing, while the independent church may preach more "fire and brimstone". Both churches may differ on one or two small details (in this example, evangelistic practices and agenda on sermons), yet both churches carry the Pentecostal banner. With this idea in mind, one must be very careful when researching the origins of the Pentecostal movement, as each church or denomination may be bias or, in come cases, prejudice, with such history.

Possibly one of the key moments, of not THE key moment, in the origins of the Pentecostal Movement took place in a small horse stable-turned-meeting house on Azusa Street in 1906. For a small group of radical believers, hungry for something more than Christianity was offering at that time, this was a turning point in their lives, and their impact would be felt worldwide. This revival, the first of its kind to make such nationwide news, involved both African Americans and Whites "breathing strange utterances and mouthing a creed which it would seem no sane mortal could understand" as well as "…practice the most fanatical rites, preach the wildest theories, and work themselves into a state of mad excitement." (Los Angeles Times, front page, April 18, 1906). To the outside on-looker at that time, this was just the act of a small group of cultists. To many Christians however, this was an event much like an event written about in the Book of Acts, Chapter Two. Its impact was phenomenal; once the word spread, it had an effect on every group calling themselves "Christian".

What brought this to the mainstream consciousness was the fact that this event was in the heart of a major city in the US, witnessed by a large number of people, and covered in the front page of a major newspaper (the main source of news at that time). The news that people were fanatically speaking in "tongues" (a language which, believers say, the Spirit gives the utterance), jumping, dancing, and to the common observer acting insanely was a major event. If any such activities occurred prior to the events on Azusa Street, such activities were isolated in rural church houses, during traveling tent revivals, or other places that were isolated from the major media at that time. However, now the spark of Pentecost became a flame, and it would not take long before this fire ignited many others worldwide, and the movement only snowballed with the inertia of radio and television in the years to come. Thus, it is said that this event, known in history as the Azusa Street Revival spawned the Pentecostal Movement worldwide.

In the years before the Azusa Street Revival and definitely afterward, many men of God, mostly "answering the call", began preaching the Gospel to those who wanted to hear, and even more who didn't. However, unlike those of the past, many of these men (in many cases self-appointed) mimicked the "radical evangelic" methods used in the New Testament, preaching on street corners, in and at large gatherings, and anywhere and everywhere "the Spirit" lead them. And not always was the message about God's love: evangelist Billy Sunday, a former baseball player turned evangelist, made quite a stir in both non-believers as well as Christians, with his "fire and brimstone" style of preaching (a model used in later years by T.V. evangelists such as Jimmy Swaggart). No longer was the sermon solely an uplifting dictation or a teaching of some truth, and no longer was it only heard on the Sabbath. Billy Sunday's preaching challenged both sinner and saint with this sermons: the sinner was challenged (as opposed to persuaded) to give his life to Christ, while the saint was challenged to spread the world of Jesus, fight sin, and live a holy life. And Billy Sunday preached his message ANYWHERE and ANYTIME he believed he was called to. Even his presence was cause for alarm and excitement: he could be seen standing on top of tables and throwing chairs in the heat of a passionate sermon. Another man who made an impact on the Pentecostal Movement was Smith Wigglesworth. An English evangelist during the 19th and 20th centuries, Wigglesworth brought to the public eye the practice of "faith healing." Throughout history, many faiths (from Roman Catholicism to Native American shamanism practices) have prayed for healings. Wigglesworth had a different approach: in the name of and with the authority of God, Wigglesworth directly commanded the illness or affliction to leave the body. He also spoke directly to the body, commanding it to be healed. He was not someone kneeling before God on someone's behalf to ask for a healing; Wigglesworth acted as God's ambassador, commanding the sickness to leave and afflicted to be healed. It is even said that Wigglesworth raised the dead. Both Sunday and Wigglesworth, and many others in the history of the Pentecostal Movement, brought fire and passion to the pulpit (and in many cases beyond), setting the groundwork for things to come.

From these humble beginnings, the Pentecostal Movement has flourished from small, almost cult-like reputation to a major force in Christianity today. The early to mid 20th Century saw the "Tent Revival" circuit come about, with many evangelists such as A. A. Allen and Oral Roberts erecting tents in open fiends throughout America. A new fire to believers came about like a traveling circus. An excellent example of such events is illustrated in the Robert Duvall film "the Apostle." Many other revival meetings, further fanning the flames of Pentecost, were held in small back-road churches, at large meetinghouses, and even on street-corners. One evangelist from Ferriday, Louisiana, W.L "Sun" Swaggart, watched his son Jimmy become one of the world's most recognized faces in the Pentecostal movement. Interesting side note: during Sun's revivals, he brought his piano playing nephew, a young man bible-school drop-out named Jerry Lee Lewis, with him for the music ministry.

Even terms such as Evangelist, Televangelist (an evangelist whose ministry is telecast on airtime paid for by contributions), "faith healer", as well as more derogatory terms like "Holy Roller," "Bible Thumper," and "Jesus Freak", are permanent parts of the American lexicon thanks to the Pentecostal Movement. Not only has this movement challenged its own believers and audience, its charisma and fanaticism continue to challenge other parts of Christianity as well; now more than ever are Methodists, Episcopalians, Lutherans, and Baptists across the country and the world taking the challenge that Pentecostalism brings. Even some Catholic services are held in a charismatic format for those who feel the need for a revival amongst them. The largest denomination of Pentecostal Christians, the Assembly of God, boasts over 38 million members worldwide. Their ministries branch into every corner of the world, and reach not only through their churches but also with the work of nearly 2000 missionaries. Other groups, such as Vineyard Christian fellowship, Praise Chapel Christian fellowship, Foursquare Gospel, and countless other churches, carry on similar works with their roots in the Pentecostal Movement.

The ideas of faith to a Pentecostal are relatively simple to grasp: Full Gospel. They model, for the most part, their church structures much the way the Apostle Paul wrote about in this letters to the early churches in Rome, Corinth, and Ephesus, as well has his letters to Timothy, Titus, and so on. Although the Old Testament is referred to for emphasis on prophecy and the history of the Jews (and subsequently the ancestry of Jesus), almost all of the Pentecostal doctrine is derived from the New Testament. The words and acts of Jesus Christ, as written in the New Testament, are taken literally, and Jesus' last command of "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matthew 28:19, 20) seems to be the common cornerstone of almost every Pentecostal church or denomination.

Depending upon the denomination, ministers ordained are either well-educated with various degrees from both non-accredited and accredited colleges, universities, and institutions, such as ministers with the Assembly of God, or in other cases such as Praise Chapel Christian Fellowship, its ministers may or may not be formally educated for ministry, but are trained and groomed within the church for ministry. Others still, mostly independent ministers and pastors, simply start churches from the scratch, often door-to-door recruiting, renting office space or using community centers, and working secular jobs to maintain the ministry (once again, an excellent example of this is in the film "the Apostle").

A synopsis of Pentecostal beliefs can be illustrated as such:

  1. The Scriptures, both Old and New Testaments, are inspired by God. Since God inspired these scriptures, they are infallible. (To eliminate the argument of translation, many Pentecostal churches use the King James Translation, which is said to be the first translation into English).

  2. There is ONE GOD, in the form of three entities or "persons": the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Although three entities, all referred to in the matriarchal sense, are all referring to God, the idea of polytheism is never brought into question by stating that the "three" are "ONE." Logically, this is impossible; yet Pentecostals believe all things are possible thru God.

  3. Pentecostals believe that Jesus Christ was both the flesh and bone Son of God, and the deity of God the Son as well. In other words, Jesus was 100% human and 100% God the son while He walked earth, and the time before and the time afterward.

  4. Pentecostals believe that mankind made a conscious effort to sin, thus bringing evil, sin, and death into the world, as we know it.

  5. Pentecostals believe that the sacrifice of Jesus Christ allows anyone who accepts Him to be saved from the evil and sin mentioned above. In many branches of Pentecostalism, this act of accepting Jesus Christ as one's "personal savior" (by asking for forgiveness of sins, accepting Jesus as their savior, and repenting from one's sinful lifestyle) is the defining point when one becomes a Christian.

  6. Pentecostals believe that two practices are required of all Christians who have accepted Jesus: Water baptism, as a symbol of burying "old man of sin"(when one is submerged into water) and "resurrection" of the new man (when one emerges); and Communion, as dictated in the Gospels (the Last Supper). Note: like most Protestant faiths, Pentecostals do NOT practice the Catholic-based ritual of Transubstantiation. The Communion bread and wine (or juice in many cases) are symbolic ("This do in remembrance of me", Jesus to his disciples at the Last Supper, Luke 22:19).

  7. Pentecostals believe in the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, as illustrated in the Book of Acts, Chapter 2. This is said to empower believers for "effective service", and evidence of such Baptism of the Holy Spirit is the "Speaking in Tongues"

  8. Pentecostals believe that sanctification occurs when receiving Jesus Christ, yet is an on-going process. In other words, a Pentecostal Christian is expected to "repent" from his/her sinful nature and strive to become like Jesus. In the event that a Christian commits sin, s/he can ask for forgiveness as long as s/he is truly repentant (this is not a license to sin).

  9. Following the words of Jesus Christ in Matthew 28:19-20, Pentecostals are charged with delivering the message of salvation & redemption to those who are lost. It is important to know that this is not a condition of salvation, but a command to those who are believers.
  10. Pentecostals believe that healing from God is a privilege to Christians, as well as a commandment to believers to pray for those who are ailing. Note: some extreme Christian fundamentalist groups, which borderline cults with their beliefs and activities, have been known to behave in such dangerous ways as to intentionally drink poisons and handle venomous snakes as an act of faith. These groups are EXTREMELY outside of the realm of Pentecostalism, although some may actually call themselves as such.

  11. Pentecostals believe that, at some moment in time, every believer, alive and dead, will be caught up in the air by Christ, prior to his second coming, and will be delivered to "a place I have prepared for you." Although the word does not exist in the Old or New Testaments with regard to this event, the term is universally called "the Rapture."

  12. Based upon prophesies in both the Old and New Testaments, it is believed that when Jesus returns, thus will begin His 1,000-year rule of Earth. The "nation of Israel" will acknowledge Him as their savior at that time (what exactly the "nation of Israel" is, whether the worldwide Jewish population or the sovereign nation of Israel or something else entirely, is uncertain).

  13. Pentecostals believe in the Final Judgment, where every person who rejects Christ will be turned over to the Lake of Fire. It is important to know that to the Pentecostal, those who reject Christ are those who do not or have not followed the criteria listed above for Salvation and Redemption. Thus, other groups known a Christian may be seen as "rejecting Christ" if they have not accepted Jesus as their savior & repented of their sins. It is this belief that seems to alienate the Pentecostal movement from many other facets of Christianity.

  14. Pentecostals believe that Jesus has a place for all believers to dwell with Him for all eternity. Once again, to the Pentecostal this is only believers following the criteria of salvation listed above, and whether this is before, during, or after the events in items 11 and 12 is uncertain. ("In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you", John 14:2)

As noted above, this is just a synopsis of the basic beliefs of Pentecostals, common between Assembly of God, Praise Chapel Christian Fellowship, and other churches. Of course, there will be some churches and/or denominations that may vary to some degree in the list mentioned above, but the general ideas and beliefs that are common are very much the same.

Another common idea within Pentecostalism is the idea that the Bible is the complete, exact word of God. The arguments of translation(s), the changing of word meanings from generation to generation, and even the canonizing of the Bible itself (choosing which books were added and which books were left out over the years) are seldom brought up within the Pentecostal Movement. The idea of "God said it, I believe it, that settles it" seems to be the catchall answer. Some call this ignorance; others (including Pentecostals) call it FAITH.

The origins of the Pentecostal movement are sketchy, at best. This may be due to the fact that there is no real organization between all churches that call themselves "Pentecostal." Some churches are independent, answering to no governing body and each may operate on its own. Other churches may be part of a network of churches, such as a fellowship or a denomination, which may share not only a name but also a documented philosophy and answer to some kind of governing hierarchy. Thus it is not uncommon for different churches and/or non-affiliated denominations to differ on some idea or detail of belief. For instance, there may be an independent church which has one philosophy of evangelism, such as "radical evangelistic" practices, operating just within walking distance from a Four Square Gospel church (part of a fellowship of churches) which has a more conservative yet organized form of evangelism. The Four Square church may preach with an emphasis on building Christians for various ministries, including witnessing, while the independent church may preach more "fire and brimstone". Both churches may differ on one or two small details (in this example, evangelistic practices and agenda on sermons), yet both churches carry the Pentecostal banner. With this idea in mind, one must be very careful when researching the origins of the Pentecostal movement, as each church or denomination may be bias or, in come cases, prejudice, with such history.

Possibly one of the key moments, of not THE key moment, in the origins of the Pentecostal Movement took place in a small horse stable-turned-meeting house on Azusa Street in 1906. For a small group of radical believers, hungry for something more than Christianity was offering at that time, this was a turning point in their lives, and their impact would be felt worldwide. This revival, the first of its kind to make such nationwide news, involved both African Americans and Whites "breathing strange utterances and mouthing a creed which it would seem no sane mortal could understand" as well as "…practice the most fanatical rites, preach the wildest theories, and work themselves into a state of mad excitement." (Los Angeles Times, front page, April 18, 1906). To the outside on-looker at that time, this was just the act of a small group of cultists. To many Christians however, this was an event much like an event written about in the Book of Acts, Chapter Two. Its impact was phenomenal; once the word spread, it had an effect on every group calling themselves "Christian".

What brought this to the mainstream consciousness was the fact that this event was in the heart of a major city in the US, witnessed by a large number of people, and covered in the front page of a major newspaper (the main source of news at that time). The news that people were fanatically speaking in "tongues" (a language which, believers say, the Spirit gives the utterance), jumping, dancing, and to the common observer acting insanely was a major event. If any such activities occurred prior to the events on Azusa Street, such activities were isolated in rural church houses, during traveling tent revivals, or other places that were isolated from the major media at that time. However, now the spark of Pentecost became a flame, and it would not take long before this fire ignited many others worldwide, and the movement only snowballed with the inertia of radio and television in the years to come. Thus, it is said that this event, known in history as the Azusa Street Revival spawned the Pentecostal Movement worldwide.

In the years before the Azusa Street Revival and definitely afterward, many men of God, mostly "answering the call", began preaching the Gospel to those who wanted to hear, and even more who didn't. However, unlike those of the past, many of these men (in many cases self-appointed) mimicked the "radical evangelic" methods used in the New Testament, preaching on street corners, in and at large gatherings, and anywhere and everywhere "the Spirit" lead them. And not always was the message about God's love: evangelist Billy Sunday, a former baseball player turned evangelist, made quite a stir in both non-believers as well as Christians, with his "fire and brimstone" style of preaching (a model used in later years by T.V. evangelists such as Jimmy Swaggart). No longer was the sermon solely an uplifting dictation or a teaching of some truth, and no longer was it only heard on the Sabbath. Billy Sunday's preaching challenged both sinner and saint with this sermons: the sinner was challenged (as opposed to persuaded) to give his life to Christ, while the saint was challenged to spread the world of Jesus, fight sin, and live a holy life. And Billy Sunday preached his message ANYWHERE and ANYTIME he believed he was called to. Even his presence was cause for alarm and excitement: he could be seen standing on top of tables and throwing chairs in the heat of a passionate sermon. Another man who made an impact on the Pentecostal Movement was Smith Wigglesworth. An English evangelist during the 19th and 20th centuries, Wigglesworth brought to the public eye the practice of "faith healing." Throughout history, many faiths (from Roman Catholicism to Native American shamanism practices) have prayed for healings. Wigglesworth had a different approach: in the name of and with the authority of God, Wigglesworth directly commanded the illness or affliction to leave the body. He also spoke directly to the body, commanding it to be healed. He was not someone kneeling before God on someone's behalf to ask for a healing; Wigglesworth acted as God's ambassador, commanding the sickness to leave and afflicted to be healed. It is even said that Wigglesworth raised the dead. Both Sunday and Wigglesworth, and many others in the history of the Pentecostal Movement, brought fire and passion to the pulpit (and in many cases beyond), setting the groundwork for things to come.

From these humble beginnings, the Pentecostal Movement has flourished from small, almost cult-like reputation to a major force in Christianity today. The early to mid 20th Century saw the "Tent Revival" circuit come about, with many evangelists such as A. A. Allen and Oral Roberts erecting tents in open fiends throughout America. A new fire to believers came about like a traveling circus. An excellent example of such events is illustrated in the Robert Duvall film "the Apostle." Many other revival meetings, further fanning the flames of Pentecost, were held in small back-road churches, at large meetinghouses, and even on street-corners. One evangelist from Ferriday, Louisiana, W.L "Sun" Swaggart, watched his son Jimmy become one of the world's most recognized faces in the Pentecostal movement. Interesting side note: during Sun's revivals, he brought his piano playing nephew, a young man bible-school drop-out named Jerry Lee Lewis, with him for the music ministry.

Even terms such as Evangelist, Televangelist (an evangelist whose ministry is telecast on airtime paid for by contributions), "faith healer", as well as more derogatory terms like "Holy Roller," "Bible Thumper," and "Jesus Freak", are permanent parts of the American lexicon thanks to the Pentecostal Movement. Not only has this movement challenged its own believers and audience, its charisma and fanaticism continue to challenge other parts of Christianity as well; now more than ever are Methodists, Episcopalians, Lutherans, and Baptists across the country and the world taking the challenge that Pentecostalism brings. Even some Catholic services are held in a charismatic format for those who feel the need for a revival amongst them. The largest denomination of Pentecostal Christians, the Assembly of God, boasts over 38 million members worldwide. Their ministries branch into every corner of the world, and reach not only through their churches but also with the work of nearly 2000 missionaries. Other groups, such as Vineyard Christian fellowship, Praise Chapel Christian fellowship, Foursquare Gospel, and countless other churches, carry on similar works with their roots in the Pentecostal Movement.

The ideas of faith to a Pentecostal are relatively simple to grasp: Full Gospel. They model, for the most part, their church structures much the way the Apostle Paul wrote about in this letters to the early churches in Rome, Corinth, and Ephesus, as well has his letters to Timothy, Titus, and so on. Although the Old Testament is referred to for emphasis on prophecy and the history of the Jews (and subsequently the ancestry of Jesus), almost all of the Pentecostal doctrine is derived from the New Testament. The words and acts of Jesus Christ, as written in the New Testament, are taken literally, and Jesus' last command of "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost" (Matthew 28:19, 20) seems to be the common cornerstone of almost every Pentecostal church or denomination.

Depending upon the denomination, ministers ordained are either well-educated with various degrees from both non-accredited and accredited colleges, universities, and institutions, such as ministers with the Assembly of God, or in other cases such as Praise Chapel Christian Fellowship, its ministers may or may not be formally educated for ministry, but are trained and groomed within the church for ministry. Others still, mostly independent ministers and pastors, simply start churches from the scratch, often door-to-door recruiting, renting office space or using community centers, and working secular jobs to maintain the ministry (once again, an excellent example of this is in the film "the Apostle").

A synopsis of Pentecostal beliefs can be illustrated as such:

  1. The Scriptures, both Old and New Testaments, are inspired by God. Since God inspired these scriptures, they are infallible. (To eliminate the argument of translation, many Pentecostal churches use the King James Translation, which is said to be the first translation into English).

  2. There is ONE GOD, in the form of three entities or "persons": the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Although three entities, all referred to in the matriarchal sense, are all referring to God, the idea of polytheism is never brought into question by stating that the "three" are "ONE." Logically, this is impossible; yet Pentecostals believe all things are possible thru God.

  3. Pentecostals believe that Jesus Christ was both the flesh and bone Son of God, and the deity of God the Son as well. In other words, Jesus was 100% human and 100% God the son while He walked earth, and the time before and the time afterward.

  4. Pentecostals believe that mankind made a conscious effort to sin, thus bringing evil, sin, and death into the world, as we know it.

  5. Pentecostals believe that the sacrifice of Jesus Christ allows anyone who accepts Him to be saved from the evil and sin mentioned above. In many branches of Pentecostalism, this act of accepting Jesus Christ as one's "personal savior" (by asking for forgiveness of sins, accepting Jesus as their savior, and repenting from one's sinful lifestyle) is the defining point when one becomes a Christian.

  6. Pentecostals believe that two practices are required of all Christians who have accepted Jesus: Water baptism, as a symbol of burying "old man of sin"(when one is submerged into water) and "resurrection" of the new man (when one emerges); and Communion, as dictated in the Gospels (the Last Supper). Note: like most Protestant faiths, Pentecostals do NOT practice the Catholic-based ritual of Transubstantiation. The Communion bread and wine (or juice in many cases) are symbolic ("This do in remembrance of me", Jesus to his disciples at the Last Supper, Luke 22:19).

  7. Pentecostals believe in the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, as illustrated in the Book of Acts, Chapter 2. This is said to empower believers for "effective service", and evidence of such Baptism of the Holy Spirit is the "Speaking in Tongues"

  8. Pentecostals believe that sanctification occurs when receiving Jesus Christ, yet is an on-going process. In other words, a Pentecostal Christian is expected to "repent" from his/her sinful nature and strive to become like Jesus. In the event that a Christian commits sin, s/he can ask for forgiveness as long as s/he is truly repentant (this is not a license to sin).

  9. Following the words of Jesus Christ in Matthew 28:19-20, Pentecostals are charged with delivering the message of salvation & redemption to those who are lost. It is important to know that this is not a condition of salvation, but a command to those who are believers.
  10. Pentecostals believe that healing from God is a privilege to Christians, as well as a commandment to believers to pray for those who are ailing. Note: some extreme Christian fundamentalist groups, which borderline cults with their beliefs and activities, have been known to behave in such dangerous ways as to intentionally drink poisons and handle venomous snakes as an act of faith. These groups are EXTREMELY outside of the realm of Pentecostalism, although some may actually call themselves as such.

  11. Pentecostals believe that, at some moment in time, every believer, alive and dead, will be caught up in the air by Christ, prior to his second coming, and will be delivered to "a place I have prepared for you." Although the word does not exist in the Old or New Testaments with regard to this event, the term is universally called "the Rapture."

  12. Based upon prophesies in both the Old and New Testaments, it is believed that when Jesus returns, thus will begin His 1,000-year rule of Earth. The "nation of Israel" will acknowledge Him as their savior at that time (what exactly the "nation of Israel" is, whether the worldwide Jewish population or the sovereign nation of Israel or something else entirely, is uncertain).

  13. Pentecostals believe in the Final Judgment, where every person who rejects Christ will be turned over to the Lake of Fire. It is important to know that to the Pentecostal, those who reject Christ are those who do not or have not followed the criteria listed above for Salvation and Redemption. Thus, other groups known a Christian may be seen as "rejecting Christ" if they have not accepted Jesus as their savior & repented of their sins. It is this belief that seems to alienate the Pentecostal movement from many other facets of Christianity.

  14. Pentecostals believe that Jesus has a place for all believers to dwell with Him for all eternity. Once again, to the Pentecostal this is only believers following the criteria of salvation listed above, and whether this is before, during, or after the events in items 11 and 12 is uncertain. ("In my Father's house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you", John 14:2)

As noted above, this is just a synopsis of the basic beliefs of Pentecostals, common between Assembly of God, Praise Chapel Christian Fellowship, and other churches. Of course, there will be some churches and/or denominations that may vary to some degree in the list mentioned above, but the general ideas and beliefs that are common are very much the same.

Another common idea within Pentecostalism is the idea that the Bible is the complete, exact word of God. The arguments of translation(s), the changing of word meanings from generation to generation, and even the canonizing of the Bible itself (choosing which books were added and which books were left out over the years) are seldom brought up within the Pentecostal Movement. The idea of "God said it, I believe it, that settles it" seems to be the catchall answer. Some call this ignorance; others (including Pentecostals) call it FAITH.


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